SODOMY: A PUBLIC HEALTH RISK

MEN:

- A 1997 study in British Columbia found the life expectancy of men who engage in sodomy to be comparable to that of the average Canadian man in 1871.  Researchers estimate that nearly half of the 20 year old men currently engaging in sodomy will not reach their 65th birthday.1

- Ninety-five percent or more of the AIDS infections among gay men result from receptive anal intercourse.2

- The risk of anal cancer "soars" by nearly 4,000% for men who have sex with men. The rate doubles again for those who are HIV positive.  A Michigan homosexual newspaper admits there is no such thing as "safe sex" to prevent this "soaring" cancer risk. Condoms offer only limited protection.3

- Homosexual men face a significantly higher risk of HIV/AIDS, hepatitis, anal cancer, gonorrhea and gastrointestinal infections as a result of their sexual practices.4  

- Men who engage in sodomy are 860% more likely to contract a sexually transmitted disease (STD), increasing up to 500% their risk of contracting HIV/AIDS. Men who commit acts of sodomy with men have large numbers of anonymous partners, which can result in rapid, extensive transmission of STDs.  Control of STDs is a central component of HIV infection prevention in the United States; resurgence of bacterial STDs threatens national HIV infection prevention efforts.5 

- Anal Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection is nearly universal among HIV-positive homosexual or bisexual men and about 60% in HIV-negative men exhibiting the same sexual behavior.6

WOMEN:

- Many innocent victims suffer the health consequences associated with sodomy as a result of blood transfusions, rape and having normal sexual relations with those who have committed unnatural relations with others.  While men of all ages who commit sodomy with other men remain at an alarming risk, young bisexual men are said to be a significant "bridge" for HIV transmission to women.7  

- Women who commit sex acts with other women face a significantly higher risk of bacterial vaginosis, breast cancer and ovarian cancer than heterosexual women.8

- The spread of Human Papilomavirus (HPV) is not prevented by condoms.  The persons most susceptible to cancer associated with HPV are young women (under 20) and people who practice anal intercourse.9

- Women who engage in receptive anal sex are at a higher risk for contracting anal cancer.  In fact, in the U.S. general population, anal cancer is more prevalent among women than men between 1.5 and 2 times more common, perhaps because more women than men engage in receptive anal sex.10

- The following chart provides a broad synopsis of medical problems related to sodomy:11

Sex Practice: Potential Consequences:
1. Close Body Contact 1. Pubic lice
2. Scabies (mites)
3. Fungal Infections
2. Performer of Oral Sex 1. Oral gonorrhea
2. Oral lesions from herpes, HPV (warts), chancroid, lymhogranuloma venereum, or granuloma inguinale.
3. Nongonolococcal pharyngitis from chlamydia, other STD's
4. Syphilis
5. Hepatitis B
6. Enteric (intestinal) infections
3. Receptive Anal Intercourse 1. Traumatic proctitis
2. Rectal gonorrhea
3. Anal warts
4. HIV/AIDS
5. Nonspecific procitis (from chlamydia and other STDs)
6. Anorectal herpes
7. Anorectal syphilis
8. Hepatitis B
9. Rectal trichomoniasis
10. Lymphogranuloma venereum
11. Anorectal granuloma inguinale
12. Anorectal chancroid
13. Cytomegalovirus
14. Anorectal candidiasis
4. Receptive Manual-Anal Intercourse  1. Enteric (intestinal) infections
5. Receiver of Oral Sex   1. Physical abrasions
2. Bites
3. Herpes
4. Urethritis from various STDs
6. Insertive Anal Intercourse   1. Nongonococcal urethritis
2. Genital herpes
3. Molluscum contagiosum
4. Genital warts
5. Syphilis
6. Trichomoniasins
7. Epididymitis and/or proctitis
8. Fungal infections
9. Lymphogranuloma vencreum
10. Granuloma inguinale
11. Chancroid
12. Hepatitis B
13. HIV/AIDS 
7. Oral-anal Intercourse 1. Enteric (intestinal) infections
2. Shigellosis
3. Campylobacter fetus (bacteria)
4. Enterogenic E. coli bacteria
5. Hepatitis (A, B, and others)
6. Amebiasis
7. Giardiasis
8. Salmonellosis
9. Enterobius vermicularis (parasite)
10. Oral warts
11. Oral gonorrhea
12. Syphilis
13. Lymphogranuloma venereum
14. Oral granuloma inguinale
15. Oral chancroid
16. HIV/AIDS
17. Herpes
18. Anorectal meningococcal infection

1. International Journal of Epidemiology, Vol 26, 657-661, "Modelling the Impact of HIV Disease on Mortality in Gay and Bisexual Men."
2. Michael Fumento, "AIDS: Are heterosexuals at Risk?" Commentary 84, (November, 1987) pp. 22-23.
3. Between the Lines, "Anal Cancer and You," Sept. 29, 2000.
4. Medical Institute of Sexual Health, "Health Implications Associated with Homosexuality," 1999.
6. Infectious Disease News, "Because of HPV, anal cancer screening indicated for certain high-risk groups," October, 1997  (link broken)
7. Manila Bulletin (Philippines), "Bisexuals Serve as 'Bridge' Infecting Women With HIV," July 30, 2000 
8. Medical Institute of Sexual Health, "Health Implications Associated with Homosexuality," 1999.
9. WebMD Forum: "HPV and Cervical Cancer with John R. Diggs, Jr., M.D.," April 7, 2000.
10. Infectious Disease News, "Because of HPV, anal cancer screening indicated for certain high-risk groups," October, 1997
11. DG & Altman Ostrow, "Homosexual Behavior and Sexually Transmitted Diseases." New York: McGraw Hill, 1990. pp. 61-69.

 
 

See also, Homosexuality: Good & Right in the Eyes of God?  Chapter V, section C on Medical Evidence.

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